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Far from the Tree: Roots

Far from the Tree: Roots

Basic Info about the Cider

Cider: Roots

Cidery: Far from the Tree

Origin: Salem, MA, USA

ABV: 6.9%

Color: Pale gold, cloudy


Our Review of the Cider

Julia's Thoughts and Rating:

As described on its label, Roots is an unpasteurized and unfiltered cider that is made using 250-year-old techniques from New England. The result is a cloudy cider that has aromatics of sweet apples and maple syrup. Upon sipping the cider, there is no bite, which is in contrast to the majority of ciders that we have reviewed. There is, however, a very slight tingling sensation on the tongue when you initially sip the cider, but that dissipates rather quickly, giving way to notes of lemon accompanied by a medium level of acidity. Secondary to that lemon flavor is an apple flavor that is reminiscent of tart baking apples, such as Northern Spy. At the end of the sip, the lemon-apple flavor becomes masked momentarily by a sweet whiskey flavor. The lemon-apple flavor reemerges in the aftertaste, with the apple flavor surpassing the lemon in potency, but both remain secondary to the whiskey taste. The acidity continues into the aftertaste as well, causing a slight drying sensation on the top of the tongue. Roots is in between light and medium bodied, leaning more toward medium due to its unfiltered quality. It is an off-dry cider: prior to the slight sweetness of the whiskey flavor at the end of the sip, there is no sweetness to it. Roots is also a relatively still cider, with the only carbonation being the slight carbonation upfront, and as for tannins, I could not pick up on any.

Overall, I really enjoyed Roots. I liked the fact that it wasn’t overly sweet, and as an occasional whiskey drinker, I loved the notes of whiskey at the end. I would definitely drink Roots again. In fact, I might have to make a return trip to Salem just to pick up another bottle.

 9 out of 10 apples

9 out of 10 apples

Ramsay's Thoughts and Rating:

  • I took a couple of sips to be sure, but there was no bite to it.

  • Due to Roots’ unfiltered quality, it has a more medium body.

  • I would say this has a lower amount of acidity, but the interesting thing is that the acidity is present throughout the entire sip. With many ciders, the acidity is in the first half, but here, it is lowish but present throughout the sip. Also unusual is the amount of carbonation. There’s basically none as far as I could tell. It is a very still cider.

  • I couldn’t pick up any tannins in Roots, even after drinking half the glass.

  • The flavor of this is somewhat hard to describe. First thing I notice is a lemon-citrus flavor that lasts for the duration of the sip. About a third into the sip, I get an apple flavor. It takes on a taste like the kind of apple you might bake with, such as a Northern Spy -- a slightly tart flavor. I swear with some sips I would get maple along with the apple and lemon flavors in the aftertaste.

  • Roots had more dry notes than sweet for sure. It would be best classified as off-dry.

  • Overall, I kept going back and forth in my mind how to feel about this cider. Sometimes I would like it more than I would normally. The ciders I tend to prefer are usually semi-dry or sweeter, but Roots was interesting. It's given me somewhat more of an appreciation of dry ciders and their flavor complexity. It may not necessarily be my first choice, but I wouldn’t say no if I saw it as an option.

 7 out of 10 apples

7 out of 10 apples

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